Pride by Ibi Zoboi – Book Review

Check out my review of Pride by Ibi Zoboi - ‘Zoboi approaches the story of Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy’s with a new, authentic and #ownvoices perspective, which is a rare occurrence in an abundance of interchangeable traditionalist retellings.’
Click on cover for the book’s description.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher Balzer + Bray and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

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Overall, I really enjoyed this refreshing take on one of my favourite classics. Zoboi approaches the story of Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy’s with a new, authentic and #ownvoices perspective, which is a rare occurrence in an abundance of interchangeable traditionalist retellings.

Though it would be worth mentioning here I would not strictly class this as a retelling; I think the cover gives a better description, ‘a Pride and Prejudice remix’. It has notes and snippets of the original story, but the beats are different. There’s nothing wrong with that, just worth mentioning if you’re going into this expecting a carbon copy of Austen’s tale adapted because this is not that book. I feel for a book to really be considered a ‘retelling’ there are certain pivotal plot points that have to be included, which in this case they weren’t. All that really features from the original text and the templates of the majority of the characters and the hate to love relationship between Darius & Zuri.

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Zuri Benitez is a really distinctive and strong narrative standpoint, and the integration of her poetry into the story was a really great touch and gave a deeper insight into her character. The rest of the cast of characters are also brilliant in their own right, both those familiar from Meryton and those unique to this book. Zoboi creates an authentic, warm and vibrant atmosphere and setting you can’t help but get caught up in. So much of this book felt like music coming off the page.

Pride does contain a lot of slang, both in narrative and dialogue which generally I don’t like but I feel as though the book would have been missing that note of veracity without it. I’ll admit, I had to consult Urban Dictionary for a lot of it (learned some new words!) because I just don’t use that much slang. It’s not that I think there’s anything wrong with it, hell half our language is based off it nowadays, it’s just not how I express myself and so I sought help from Google.

However, I still felt I missed a lot in this book. When Zuri speaks to Warren and other people in her neighbourhood who share her culture she often references ‘a secret language’ those involved in the conversation all understand. This language is never really translated to the reader and as a result, I kind of felt like I was on the outside looking in, in places.

Related imageI recognise I am not really the target audience for this book but at the same time, I feel #ownvoices books like this have a secondary purpose, as well as representing marginalised cultures and minorities. That secondary purpose being to remedy ignorance by bringing attention and educating the reader about these marginalised cultures and their beliefs and points of view. This is a small qualm really, and some things could be inferred but at times it really did feel like I was reading another language as the words being exchanged were clearly loaded with meaning but I just didn’t know what it was.

The characters undergo similar development to those in P&P but my only real problem was with an aspect of Zuri’s development. Though I know prejudice is a huge aspect of this novels makeup I found Zuri more than a little close-minded throughout the book and it’s not a trait she entirely lets go of. From her opinion to her changing neighbourhood – which, fair enough I understand having seen my own city change dramatically over past years, but I’m a firm believer places shouldn’t be defined as belonging to one ethnicity or one culture, there should just be places that we, the only race on Earth, the human race, are free to move freely between and live in without being made to feel or believe we have no right to be and I mean anybody when I say that, though I’m well aware it only goes one way at the moment and that sucks – to her constant perpetuation of what she thought Darius ought to be like because he’s black, and her complete refusal to try and get to know people with a different background to her own.

It just sort of grated on what I felt Austen wanted to represent in Elizabeth Bennett who, for her time, was forward thinking and nonconformist woman, made more brilliant for the fact she used her intelligence and other people’s prejudices and preconceptions to get away with it.

Zuri seems closer to acceptance at the end of the novel and I suppose these frustrations are a sign Zoboi wrote her book well as, though I understand their equivalents in the original text, the chronological difference prevents me from really feeling anything for the struggles of the Bennett sisters, where the Bentitez sisters’ struggles feel immediate and relevant to me.

A great read for Afro-Latinx women wanting to see themselves represented by an ingenuitive female author or anyone wanting to try something new and experience a culture I know I personally haven’t been able to before.

Check out my review of Pride by Ibi Zoboi - ‘Zoboi approaches the story of Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy’s with a new, authentic and #ownvoices perspective, which is a rare occurrence in an abundance of interchangeable traditionalist retellings.’
Check out my review of Pride by Ibi Zoboi - ‘Zoboi approaches the story of Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy’s with a new, authentic and #ownvoices perspective, which is a rare occurrence in an abundance of interchangeable traditionalist retellings.’
Check out my review of Pride by Ibi Zoboi - ‘Zoboi approaches the story of Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy’s with a new, authentic and #ownvoices perspective, which is a rare occurrence in an abundance of interchangeable traditionalist retellings.’

 

And The Ocean Was Our Sky by Patrick Ness – Book Review

See my review of the new lyrical tale from the brilliant Patrick Ness – an illustrated parable depicting an age old war between man and whale.
Click on cover for the book’s description.

I received this book from the publisher, HarperTeen, and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

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This book is every bit as profound, hauntingly beautiful and lyrical as I have come to expect Ness’ work to be. Though this kind of storytelling doesn’t particularly resonate with me personally, having read another illustrated tale by Ness (A Monster Calls) I can see his unique mark in the writing and I have to acknowledge that he is clearly a man that knows his craft. The characters are well fleshed out for a mere 100 pages of book, which is a feat, and the description of this secret world beneath the ocean was compelling in of itself because I found myself wanting to know and see more.

I feel this book makes far more sense, far more quickly, if you know you are reading from the perspective of a whale before you start. This may be my own fault for not reading the description, or seeing the cover and not immediately thinking ‘yup, whale narrative’. Either way, I picked it up fairly quickly.

Illustrations by Rovina Cai.
Illustrations by Rovina Cai.

On the face of it, this is a very pretty book indeed, brilliant in its simplicity, however, a large part of this book centres around a war between whale and humans started when men began hunting their kind in the form of the now-mythological figure of Toby Wick. This war and the way it has affected each character and construct as a result adds a dark twist that gets darker still the harder you look at it.

Illustrations by Rovina Cai.
Illustrations by Rovina Cai.

Like with most pretty things, the viciousness is cleverly disguised and I found myself taking a mental step back as I read some pretty vivid and horrifying descriptions of violence and behaviour I simply hadn’t expected when I began the story. These descriptions are then made worse by the fact that they feel so real because somewhere in the world they are real. I am of course an objector to animal cruelty, poaching and by extension, whaling but never has the issue has never felt so close and real to me.

This book asks difficult questions about war, religion, morality, right, wrong, love, racism, power, obsession and honour and I feel that had I read it in a different time in my life it would have been more percipient to me personally but it was very thought-provoking despite this.

The illustrations will be something to behold in print. My digital copy didn’t carry most of them forward completely but the glimpses I saw were fantastic.

Warning: As mentioned previously there are very graphic and evocative scenes of violence and cruelty both toward whales and humans and if you’re sensitive to that sort of thing this is perhaps not a read for you.
See my review of the new lyrical tale from the brilliant Patrick Ness – an illustrated parable depicting an age old war between man and whale.
See my review of the new lyrical tale from the brilliant Patrick Ness – an illustrated parable depicting an age old war between man and whale.
See my review of the new lyrical tale from the brilliant Patrick Ness – an illustrated parable depicting an age old war between man and whale.
Book Reviews by Bloodthirsty Little Beasts