One of the premier titles of the new DC Ink imprint, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass is a fantastic origin / coming-of-age story, centred on a young Harleen Quinzel that you can’t help but fall a little bit in love with.

Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass by Mariko Tamaki – Comic Book Review

One of the premier titles of the new DC Ink imprint, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass is a fantastic origin / coming-of-age story, centred on a young Harleen Quinzel that you can’t help but fall a little bit in love with.
Click cover to read book’s description.

First, a thank you to Edelweiss and DC Ink for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.


Disclaimers

I have not read any Harley Quinn solo titles prior to this book, equally, this is the first DC Ink title I have read. The ARC I received contained only the first issue in this series.

It’s also worth mentioning that due to my limited previous reading in this genre if you think I’m being too harsh or too generous with my assessment of writing or art, it’s probably due to my limited frame of reference and there isn’t a lot I can do about that.


Review

This is set up to become a fantastic origin / coming-of-age story for Harleen Quinzel. The writer captures the ‘voice’ of our tough, outspoken and sometimes rebellious protagonist brilliantly and I can already tell this will be a brilliant book you can give to any Harley fan.

Artwork by Steve Pugh.
Artwork by Steve Pugh.

This first issue is told entirely by Harley as a prelude to the series, and it carries a great subversive fairy tale vibe from the start and introduced key players in her life including Mama (her drag queen patron) and Poison Ivy (her future best friend and partner in crime).

This will be a great book to give to young girls especially since, unlike her older far more insane alter ego, I actually feel Harleen is a decent, relatable role model that if handled correctly, could offer didactic and introspective messages to young women. The story centres on a very different Harley that most people expect. As the title suggests, at this point in her life Harley is already breaking proverbial glass ceilings from the start with her non-nonsense explanation of how she would have handled Little Red Riding Hood’s situation had it been her and her fierce determination to stand on her own two feet.

Artwork by Steve Pugh.

The art by Steve Pugh (The Flintstones) is different from any I’ve read so far but I think it suited the story perfectly and I adored how even though she isn’t yet Harley Quinn, her aesthetic was incorporated into her street clothes subtlety and in keeping with how I can actually imagine a young Harley dressing.

This book was published under the imprint DC Ink, a new line of original comics aimed at young adults aged 13 to 17 (with a pretty awesome array of authors from that genre too) and if Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass is anything to go by, I think DC is going to achieve all there are set out to with this new line. I will definitely be following it closely.

Writing Quality – 9/10

Image/Illustration Quality – 8/10

Character Development – 8/10

Overall – 8/10


One of the premier titles of the new DC Ink imprint, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass is a fantastic origin / coming-of-age story, centred on a young Harleen Quinzel that you can’t help but fall a little bit in love with.
One of the premier titles of the new DC Ink imprint, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass is a fantastic origin / coming-of-age story, centred on a young Harleen Quinzel that you can’t help but fall a little bit in love with.
One of the premier titles of the new DC Ink imprint, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass is a fantastic origin / coming-of-age story, centred on a young Harleen Quinzel that you can’t help but fall a little bit in love with.
Book Reviews by Bloodthirsty Little Beasts

 

3 thoughts on “Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass by Mariko Tamaki – Comic Book Review

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s